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[Doofers] Dynamic Bass Modulator

Bass exiter rumble remover

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#1 TheBellows

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 21:55

File Name: Dynamic Bass Modulator

File Submitter: TheBellows

File Submitted: 11 Aug 2017

File Category: Doofers

License: CC0, Public Domain


Simply explained this doofer contains 12 signal followers which are connected to each their own EQ. Signal followers are set to react to set frequencies in a way that it ducks the specific frequency while raising the frequencies one half note away in both directions.
Be careful while adjusting the 'Fill Size' and 'Fill Mass' as they can be very temperamental. If you leave the Limiter>Booster at the middle position it will limit the signal.

 

I planned to make it bigger and more advanced, but it was a lot of tedious work and it's already pretty CPU unfriendly, so this will have to do for now. I think it works pretty good though, once you got it fine tuned to the input it can add some warmth to the sound and change the character a bit and remove some rumble.
I'll probably make some more versions of this later with a wider range, but this version concentrates on the frequencies between 130Hz - 260Hz which is really more in the mid area. I'll add another version soon that includes the lower frequencies too.


Click here to download this file


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#2 Land of Bits

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 15:59

man never thought to use several signal followers reacting to different frequencies you do the splitting using the multiband send

 

now i think i can use the multiband send + signal follower + hydra to control a lot of parameters maybe some real time knob tweaking could be cool :)


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#3 TheBellows

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 16:23

It certainly doesn't work as optimal as i'd like, because the filter curves doesn't seem steep enough for fine precision, but the concept could very well be useful in other setups. I'd say this doofer is more like a test of concept, as it's very CPU unfriendly and probably not all that useful in most projects.

 

Your suggestion using multiband send will probably work a lot better as it has better filters (i believe), but you can't contain that in a doofer and does require a bit of work setting it up.

You could in theory add 120 multiband sends and make each just send through the mid channel to each their own send track and tune every mid channel to each their own note, you could make it reatc to 10 whole octaves. I'd like to try this just to see if it's possible, but it's of course nothing you would normally want to do, but i think the concept is interesting.

 

The main idea of this concept was to make it compress/limit dynamically based on frequencies rather than amplitude like a regular compressor/limiter (actually that's how this doofer works in a way, though it doesn't work well enough for this purpose at all really). I think maybe the problem with this is that EQ can't react fast enough and i'm not so shure the lookahead of the signal follower can compensate for it? I think phasing could also be an issue with all this EQ'ing and it's definately not very CPU friendly. I think the signal follower just isn't effective enough for this purpose as i would assume that it uses far more resources than it could have done if it was designed just for this one specific task. 

Are there already limiters that work similar to this? I mean ideally a limiter would only lower the frequency spikes that goes above the threshold, wouldn't it? I can't say i find this to work very well, at least on most free limiters though. I guess that's what separates a free shitty algorithm limiters from so called transparent limiters? How transparent do they get? I mean, if most frequencies goes beyond the threshold, does it still sound good except for the loss in dynamics, it's gotta sound terrible at one point won't it?


Edited by TheBellows, 29 August 2017 - 16:37.

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