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Y-command on track level?


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#1 Man

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 19:16

It would be interesting to be able to say "50% chance of track 3 playing", meaning a Y-command (probability) could be used, in this case, Y50.

Or : one could create the Y-command as a DSP-effect.

 

It would make for possibly cool auto-arrangements! smile.png

 



#2 OopsIFly

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 21:29

use the y command to trigger dc samples. these can be sensed by signal followers, effectively converting them to meta parameter controllers. then you can control any dsp parameter with it. take care not to input the dc samples into master, but mute them somehow after the signal follower. cheers!


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#3 Man

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 23:23

lol And now : in English!

Really, drop the tech-speak a shade or 10.

 

Another option I could see is : use a Y-command on the first note of a track and then use something liike "YFF", meaning keep using the same Y-state (play it or not) for the remainder of the track.

Yes, that would be the easiest solution I think.

Whadya say, devs?

 

[edit]

OH!  I think I got the solution!  Well, A solution.

Just render the whole track-to-sample and put Y on the C4 note at position 1.

Right?


Edited by Man, 01 December 2017 - 23:25.


#4 Neurogami

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 23:37

lol And now : in English!

Really, drop the tech-speak a shade or 10.

 

 

If there's something you don't understand perhaps you could politely ask someone to explain it.

 

It's better than snark.



#5 Neurogami

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Posted 02 December 2017 - 18:06

use the y command to trigger dc samples. these can be sensed by signal followers, effectively converting them to meta parameter controllers. then you can control any dsp parameter with it. take care not to input the dc samples into master, but mute them somehow after the signal follower. cheers!

 

Yes.   With a little tweaking I got it so I can have a track mute semi-randomly during a pattern.

 

This is somewhat like my tool Randy Note Columns

 

https://github.com/N...eColumns.xrnx  



#6 OopsIFly

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Posted 02 December 2017 - 19:58

Hehheh, sorry if it was beyond your comprehension. This is not beginner's section, and I had no clue of your technical/renoise knowledge when I wrote the post, I just tried to get the info condensed in a small post.

 

Well the principle is: 1) you can trigger samples randomly with the y command. 2) you can sense the samples with a signal follower. 3) with a signal follower you can (among other things) mute/unmute a track.

 

the trigger samples need not be in the mix, but you will need extra tracks set up for them with a signal follower inside. I use "DC" samples for such purposes, which are straight line positive "Direct Current" samples, the reason is that signal followers will react very accurately to them, and you can shape them with volume envelopes, but you can use any samples as long as you are happy with the way the signal followers react. you can also make one signal follower control multiple things at once with a hydra, for example to make the trigger sample switch between 2 tracks.

 

Here, I just created a simple example which uses the mutually exclusive mode of the y command to switch between three channels, each playing one of the standard renoise breakbeats. Feel free to ask questions. This should maybe be considered an "advanced" technique of using renoise and rather brainfucked, so don't feel silly for not understanding everything at once. There is some magic going on in various places of the setup to make it work. Also I had to make the trigger samples (the three DCs each routed to their own tracks with signal followers) statically 2 lines long with volume envelopes, maybe there are better solutions for the overlapping problem in the scenario I used.

 

P.S.: take care with dc samples, they are not supposed to hit your speakers or headphones, try to always make sure they are properly muted after the signal followers when they are played back somehow...

Attached Files


Edited by OopsIFly, 02 December 2017 - 20:03.


#7 Man

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Posted 03 December 2017 - 18:04

Hehheh, sorry if it was beyond your comprehension. This is not beginner's section, and I had no clue of your technical/renoise knowledge when I wrote the post, I just tried to get the info condensed in a small post.

 

Well the principle is: 1) you can trigger samples randomly with the y command. 2) you can sense the samples with a signal follower. 3) with a signal follower you can (among other things) mute/unmute a track.

 

the trigger samples need not be in the mix, but you will need extra tracks set up for them with a signal follower inside. I use "DC" samples for such purposes, which are straight line positive "Direct Current" samples, the reason is that signal followers will react very accurately to them, and you can shape them with volume envelopes, but you can use any samples as long as you are happy with the way the signal followers react. you can also make one signal follower control multiple things at once with a hydra, for example to make the trigger sample switch between 2 tracks.

 

Here, I just created a simple example which uses the mutually exclusive mode of the y command to switch between three channels, each playing one of the standard renoise breakbeats. Feel free to ask questions. This should maybe be considered an "advanced" technique of using renoise and rather brainfucked, so don't feel silly for not understanding everything at once. There is some magic going on in various places of the setup to make it work. Also I had to make the trigger samples (the three DCs each routed to their own tracks with signal followers) statically 2 lines long with volume envelopes, maybe there are better solutions for the overlapping problem in the scenario I used.

 

P.S.: take care with dc samples, they are not supposed to hit your speakers or headphones, try to always make sure they are properly muted after the signal followers when they are played back somehow...

Hey sorry for being a bit of a d1ck, I had a bit too much to drink. :/

Thanks for the xrns, I'll study it well.


Edited by Man, 03 December 2017 - 18:05.