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Boss DR 660 vs Renoise

drum machines hardware sequencer comparison

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#126 Renoised

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 00:11

@Renoised: I'll take that to heart, but for now I've got to focus on other things first before I delve into that territory..I also think it can be a bit dangerous. Nowadays, especially in electronic music, people get so obsessive about mastering, eqing, compression etc...and they do so for the wrong reasons, imo. It's a "shine the turd!"-kinda thing most of the time, you know what I mean? You listen to their music, yeah, it's crafted well and "technically" well done, but it's got no soul. It's just mindless crap. Lots of music out there is like that now.

I also don't like the sound quality, really. Maybe it's those Native Instruments plugins or whatever (not shi**ing on them, Reaktor etc. is the bomb), but it sounds really plastic to me. And not even in a good, Squarepusher kind of way, because his stuff from back then was digital, too...But something "bad" (to my ears at least) is happening there.

 

For now, what I'm mostly concentrating on is planning out song structures in my head and writing them down, playing reverse soloes over some of my riffs, trying to find some of my own licks in there etc etc...Really getting away a little from the way my brain works when I'm programming. So I'm not that concentrated on production techniques right now, I just really gotta get my guitar playing in order first. The simplicity of the 4-track lets me do that and I don't get drowned in unnecessary details having to do with its architecture.

 

Isn't cassette coming back, though? I've heard something like that, I think my mother told me something about that (and if she hears about stuff like that, then it must have been emerging on the surface already)

 

The gear I mentioned is pretty essential stuff to be honest mate, and I don't just mean for polishing a track (and sure, you need not do that), but I mean it's important for getting the individual tracks down in the first place, in a good quality way.  For example, an analogue compressor is very important because you're working with tape.  Using a compressor properly would, for example, allow you to switch-off noise reduction and saturate the tape much harder, while at the same time, surpressing hiss more than the noise reduction system alone would.  It's a dynamics processor, and what most people playing with this stuff don't realise is that Dolby and dbx are basically a type of dynamic compressor.  So it's an important thing to have when you work with tape.  Well ok not "essential", but you know what I mean, it's a very good thing.

Notice in that video above he says that his machine is no good for dance music or whatever, but that's nonsense.  It's good for whatever you want as long as you have the necessary equipment attached to it.  You could record an entire classical piece on that thing if you had the gear I'm telling you about, you'd be able to hear the most distant instrument without even a hint of hiss.  You might think, nah, I'm really really really old-school, they never bothered with compressors on those early recordings, but actually they did, even without a compressor attached to it, cause the noise reduction systems themselves are a type of compressor.

 

A Parametric EQ where each band can sweep the full frequency range, is the most important peice of studio outboard equipment you can buy.  Again, it's not just used for polishing a track, it's a tool that can, for example, change a very plain violin to a very hauntung one.  It can change your guitar to one completely unrecognisable, compared to what you normally get from it, like picking up a different guitar with different properties.  Don't assume that a proper analogue parametric EQ sounds or even behaves like a digital one, because it doesn't, and you'll be in for quite a shock if you ever use a real one (especially a good one).  The best way to be convinced is to forget about the price, and just visit a music store that has one and allows you to feed some of your own music into it while you tweak the knobs.  It'll take less than ten seconds for you to say - FFFFFFUCK!!!

 

Like I said, once people are exposed to that specific type of EQ, one with full-range sweeping and plenty of gain, nothing less will do, and because they're such expensive studio tools, people often end-up having to build their own (which isn't actually that hard).  It's not possible to use one and not end up with one, they're that good.

 

The Sonic Exciter is also a "secret weapon".  Again, it being analogue means it behaves and impresses much differently to digital efforts, and what's cool about the SX3040 is it's analogue, stereo, and combines both a bass enhancer and exciter in a single unit.  The Behringer sounds better than stuff that costs six times as much.  These devices are usualy mono, but due to the SX3040 being stereo, you get to use it for spatial type effects as well as adding incredible fatness to bass, and crazy amounts of air to vocals, pads, string, guitar etc.  You know when people say stuff like "It makes the hairs on the back of my neck stand on end?"

 

Well that's what the SX3040 does, completely in analogue, it's a magic box, the type of stuff the big studios used to use when people wondered why there own stuff never sounded as good.  A lot of it is down to those types of devices, exciters, enhancers etc, and the Behringer does that all in one unit (in stereo).  I can tell you now, putting that Summer Affair track though it the other day did exactly that, the guitar gave me goosebumps.  It sounds awesome enough without it, but completely mind-blowing with it.

 

So I hear you, and it's cool to hear you'll consider them, but just be sure you actually do some day, because there is no going back once you do ;)

 

As for cassette coming back, sure it's coming back, although I have no idea when it will kick-in in a major way.  Actually though, cassette never left us, nor did vinyl, both have been in production since their invention.  Neither of those formats can ever be killed-off, because they're analogue, meaning it'll always be open to even the indie and boutique manufacturers to manufacture both the machines and the media they require.  There is no dependence on any one company, cause no company owns either of those formats, and can never do so.  It's an awsome thing, freedom!

 

Yup, both formats will still be around when every one of us are long dead, enjoying our sex-orgies in Hell :yeah:


 


Edited by Renoised, 16 February 2018 - 00:13.

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#127 clirke21

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Posted 17 February 2018 - 22:57

@Renoised: Isn't that what mastering engineers are for? Just kidding.  :clownstep:

Yeah, I also didn't get that part. I don't look at gear like that anyways, that it's just good for genre X. I don't think in genres.

I actually don't use dbx. I'm really going for the Frusciante tone here and he didn't use it as well, I kinda like the grittiness of it.

 

I'll consider them for sure at some point. I still see myself in a developmental period (I guess I'll never feel like I'm out of it) as I'm completely focussed on my ideas and realizing them as best as possible. Still far from it, imo, but I'm getting there. That's where my focus lies. And that's why I'm not so concerned about these things RIGHT NOW. Just lack of patience, I guess.

 

Yeah, I'd love for these things to come back. In many cases when it comes to analogue, the prices just make it Not worth it. And I hope that with it resurfacing, that this problem will be solved. It's already happening when it comes to analog synths luckily, but still many old ones are overly expensive (in a ridiculous, criminal way). I hate that world.



#128 Renoised

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 02:00

I meant to ask the other day, have you got a website or YouTube channel for your stuff?
Just curious to hear what you're up to with your gritty ol' multi-track :badteethslayer:



#129 clirke21

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 21:59

I meant to ask the other day, have you got a website or YouTube channel for your stuff?
Just curious to hear what you're up to with your gritty ol' multi-track :badteethslayer:

 

Nah, not really. I mostly make it for myself as some sort of diary, I guess. Never seriously considered releasing anything.



#130 Renoised

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 23:09

I know what you mean, I've not done anything either, well not yet anyway, but I've had ideas for albums lined-up for a long time so hopefully I'll get something done in the not too distant future.



#131 clirke21

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 18:06

I know what you mean, I've not done anything either, well not yet anyway, but I've had ideas for albums lined-up for a long time so hopefully I'll get something done in the not too distant future.

 

It's not that I haven't done anything yet, because I have hundreds of finished tracks on my laptop and some stuff on cassette. None of it was made with me wanting to get it out there and none of it is worth releasing, in my opinion. There's so much music out there that I want to be picky when it comes to contributing something and not just increase the level of noise, if that makes sense. I still believe in the old format of albums, so at some point I might compile something that has some continuity to it. :>


Edited by clirke21, 19 February 2018 - 18:10.


#132 encryptedmind

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 01:19

"I wish I knew the proper terms for guitar stuff, cause I'd love to know if there's a term for how hard the strings are to press. I noticed some years back when trying-out some electric guitars, that some were really hard to play, but others were pleasantly easy. If there's a term to describe a guitar with easy strings that aren't a mile-off the fret-board, I'd really love to know what it is."

@Renoised: It's called guitar fretboard 'action'. High action is greater height of the strings from the fretboard and low action is the opposite. It's a general determiner of playing comfort for certain styles and also for choosing a particular guitar make or build. Flamenco and classical in general have higher actions( classical guitars use nylon strings). Steel wound string guitars which are the more common types seen everywhere have mod to low action. For a really low electric guitar style action for maximum speed and comfort I would recommend Tagima Dallas T/Vegas/Kansas which are made in Brazil. I also use Hertz and Ibanez but the Tagima guitar is really sexy and it's got built in EQ and a battery compartment with a semi acoustic pickup, which is great for tone sculpting and for use via electric guitar pedals. The only other thing you need is a portable tuner(super important). A novice mistake is to start a practice and recording session without first ensuring that all strings are tuned to perfection, otherwise it's like playing a keyboard with detuned keys, never sounds good at all. Second thing is playing posture which should enable the fretboard to be as static as possible and not use your playing left hand to support the fretboard. Rather your fingers can be taken off at any time and fretboard should be still or steady like a rock. Third, don't press too hard with your hands, the strength will come with time and dedicated practice. Fourth, ensure that the chords you play sound well and clear in every string and that muted work as they should.

http://www.tagima.co...n/acusticos.php

Guitar glossary online for new owners.

https://www.guitarfo...m/glossary.html

Excerpt:

Glossary of terms
Accented note A note played with more emphasis than others.

Action A word used to describe the distance of the strings off the fretboard, as in "high" or "low" action.

Archtop A type of acoustic or semi-acoustic guitar, with an arched soundboard, often played by jazz guitarists.

Arpeggio The playing of the tones of a chord separately, rather than simultaneously.

Augmented The quality of a chord having its intervals as the 1st, 3rd and sharp 5th notes of the major scale. See this page.

Barre chord A chord which uses the index finger to bar across several strings to act as the nut. Familiar shapes are fingered to the treble side of it. More here.

Bend A technique used to raise the pitch of a note by pushing the string sideways across the fretboard. See Bending.

Bridge The part of the guitar where the strings transmit their vibrations to the soundboard. Made of either wood or metal. See Anatomy.

Capo A device which clamps onto the fretboard acting as the nut. Allows unfriendly keys to be changed to friendly. More here.

Chord A group of scale notes which are played together, the simplest being the triad consisting of the 1st, 3rd and 5th of the scale. Read all about chords starting here.

Dead note A muted note played with no discernible pitch.

Diminished The quality of a chord having its intervals as the 1st, flat 3rd and flat 5th of the major scale.

Double stop Two notes played simultaneously.

Fingerpicking A pattern-based way of playing through chord progressions using the fingers.

Finger Style The art of playing guitar with the fingers rather than a flatpick. The thumb and up to three fingers are used.

Flatwound strings Steel strings which use flat ribbon winding rather than round wire for the thicker strings.
Preferred by jazz guitarists.

Fretboard The fretted surface of the neck where you do the playing, sometimes known as the fingerboard.

Fret The wire inset on fret board; also describes the distance between notes on the fretboard.

F-Hole The F shaped opening in the sound board of some guitars, usually archtops or resonators.

Ghost note A note played very quietly; the opposite of an accented note.

Grace note An ornamental note usually played just before a main note.

Hammer-on The creation of a new and higher note by hammering down on an already ringing string on a new fret; opposite of a pull-off.

Harmonic A bell-like sound created by gently touching the string at certain points.

Headstock The "top" of the guitar, where the tuning pegs are.

Improvisation The art of inventing music on the fly. This is achieved by knowing the structure of music, hearing it and inventing according to the rules.

Interval The "distance" between any two notes, usually measured relative to the major scale.

Inversion The order in which the tones of a triad are stacked: Root position: 1-3-5; First inversion: 3-5-1; Second inversion: 5-1-3. See Slash chords.

Legato Italian for 'tied together'. If you hammer-on or pull-off notes, you're playing legato style. See Hammer 0n and Pull off.

Major The quality of a chord having its intervals as the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the major scale.

Minor The quality of a chord having its intervals as the 1st, flat 3rd and 5th of the major scale

Mode Another word for scale. The major scale yields 7 modes, one starting and ending on each note. More on modes here.

Muting A technique used to muffle the ringing of notes, usually done with the edge of the hand placed gently on the strings near the bridge.

Nut The small grooved piece of bone that the strings sit in between the fretboard and the headstock.

Palm mute A technique used to muffle the ringing of notes, done with the edge of the palm. See Muting.

Pickup The electronic device used to pick up the sound of electric guitar strings. There are many types and configurations.

Pitch pipe Old fashion device used for tuning guitars. Works by tuning to the notes created by blowing into its six tubes.

Plectrum Official word for guitar pick.

Power chord Not really a chord; a double stop consisting of a root and a fifth of the chord, omitting the third.

Pull-off The creation of a new note by pulling your finger off an already ringing note to a lower fretted or open note; opposite of a hammer-on.

Resonator The circular speaker-like device, usually chrome, that fits into the body of some guitars, used to increase volume.

Root Sometimes referred to as 'root note' -- Another word for Tonic, or the first note of a scale.

Saddle The upright blade which sits in the bridge, often bone, where the strings sit. See Anatomy.

Scale A series of intervals, usually spanning an octave. Scales are more often viewed as a series of notes (generated by the intervals).

Slash chord A chord such as G/B, meaning a G chord with a B bass note. See Slash chords

Slide A tube which fits on the finger and is used to slide along the strings to alter the pitch of notes (see Slide or Bottleneck Guitar); also the technique of sliding notes or chord shapes up the fretboard (see Sliding).

Sound hole The round hole on the front of most acoustic guitars.

Sound board The front surface of acoustic guitars. This is where the sound from the strings is amplified via the bridge.

Sus4 A chord consisting of the 1st, 4th and 5th notes of the major scale. The (4) in effect replaces the (3). This chord demands resolution.

Tablature A pictorial system of notation for guitar music, showing six strings and fret positions.

Tail piece The metal device usually used on archtop guitars to anchor the strings beyond the bridge.

Tapping A hammer-on technique that is done with the right hand.

Thumb pick A plastic pick which fits around the thumb and projects a blade out to act as a pick.

Tonic The tonic; the first note of a scale; the main note of a chord, the note the chord is named after. Also known as the "root".

Tremolo The very fast repetition of notes; or an electronic effect that varies the volume in a regular pulsating manner.

Triad The simplest, smallest chord there is, consisting of the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the scale.

Trill A rapid movement between two notes.

Triplet A group of three notes played where two would be played.

Truss rod A steel rod which fits inside the neck of some guitars. Its tension can be adjusted to straighten the neck.

Tuner An electronic device used to tune guitars.

Tuning pegs The geared devices on the headstock used to tighten or loosen the strings. also known as Machine Heads.

Vibrato The 'wobbling' of notes, done by physically moving the strings across the fretboard. See Vibrato.

Whammy bar A lever attached to the bridge of electric guitars that can be used to alter the pitch of notes.

Edited by encryptedmind, 20 February 2018 - 01:35.

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#133 Renoised

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 15:37

@Clirke, Yeah, that was a very big part of album making, deciding the order or tracks etc.  Also, the analogue formats, open-reel, cassette, and vinyl weren't really conductive to convenient track skipping like CD and the digital file formats are, and I think that played a large part in forcing the artist to think more and produce albums of quality rather than the conveniently skippable garbage they put out these days.

 

@Vic, Thanks a lot for that, in fact you answered my question right from the start, so I'm to take it I need to look for 'Low-Action' guitars then.  At least when I need to call or visit a music store I can explain better without looking like a complete tit.  If I choose to go for an electric guitar, I think I found one (but won't know for sure until I've tried it).  However, those electro acoustics you point out are not available over here from the looks of it, so I'd have to play around with some other brand before I even decide what type I want.  Something that does concern me is that stuff about Hi-Z inputs, or guitar inputs.  I always assumed I'd just be able to connect the guitar directly to my multitrack or sampler and adjust the gain.  Is that correct, or do I need some sort of box before I feed it into those devices?

BTW, regards the electric guitar, there was one a few years back called a Jaxville Demon.  It was cheap, but it was the easiest guitar (lowest action) I found to play, had three pickups, tone and volume, and a five-way selector.  Unfortunaltey it's no longer available, but in it's place is a guitar called the Chord CAL63X (see pictures).  If my suspicions are correct, and it's basically a Jaxville Demon with different finish and branding, then I think that's the electric I would go for if io went for electric.  Like I said though, I'll have to try it first, and I'll have to decide whether I want electric or electro acoustic, cause to be honest, despite them being very different guitars, I can't decide.  On top of that, I keep leaning towards an electro acoustic cause I suspect I would be able to make it sound like an electric guitar anyway, just by putting it through the samplers effects processors.  I'm not sure I would be able to do that the other way around though, cause an electric guitar doesn't have a chamber like an acoustic one does, well, not the ones I'm looking at.

 

Anyway, here's the electric that's a very real possibility, if it's the replacement guitar for the model I think it is.  I know from first-hand experience it's a very nice and versatile guitar if it is what I think it is, and as you can see, even the pictures show a very low-action (which makes me all the more sure about it).  Basically, where the Jaxville Demon once was, has been replaced with this one, and the spec and shape look identical, just a different brand and finish.

 

I like the look of it as well, looks better than similar guitars I've seen costing considerably more money - so what do you think to it mate? :yeah:
 

 

11530970-2104508389361526.jpg     11530970-2004508389387632.jpg



#134 Renoised

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 16:09

BTW, sorry Clirke, feels like I hijacked your thread a bit, so just tell me to piss-off if you feel so inclined  :badteeth: 



#135 clirke21

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 17:11

@Renoised: The action can be adjusted on most guitars, so you don't have to look for a specific one, really. Having said that, I think acoustic guitars in general have higher action and most people use thicker strings on them, so take that into account in case you're interested in that. But I haven't played one yet, so I might be talking out of my *** here.

You should also take string gauge into consideration which also has an impact on how easy or difficult it is to play your guitar. And then there's the question of scale length (also in conjunction with your chosen string gauge)..It's endless, so it's helpful to learn how to set the guitar up yourself, because then you can really make it play like it suits you best (action, neck relief, intonation, pickup height etc.). Sounds a bit intimidating at first, but it's not a big deal, really. 

 

I'm a big fan of Squier guitars. They're affordable and some of them are really high quality especially considering the price. If you're interested in Strats, then you can also take a look at older, used Mexican models (I got one of these). They're around the same price range as high end Squiers and are really good. Thomann also makes really affordable guitars, some of the semi-acoustic ones are exceptionally good for the price (Harley Benton). It's important to remember though that new guitars of a lower price-range are often not set up very well. Buying them can sometimes be a hit-or-miss. But again, adjustments aren't really that difficult to do.

 

It depends on what you wanna do with it, really. I'm mostly playing a Strat right now, because I'm currently into blues, funk and post-punk that references that kind of stuff (Talking Heads, Television etc.), but the first guitar I got was a Squier Jaguar, because of it's vibrato bar which is fun for Shoegaze stuff and one can play Johnny Marr stuff on it and it sounds right. Another reason why I prefer the Strat right now is because of its feel. The body is great and it's lighter and smaller than the Jaguar (though the Jaguar is easier to play due to its shorter scale length and the kind of strings I got on it), but in the end, they're both amazing guitars. I may get myself a Telecaster at some point as well. :3 The twangy sound is absolutely hypnotizing.

 

So just figure out what you wanna do, references etc. and that should make the decision easier. It did so for me at least.

 

Edit: If you're interested in a Jaguar or Jazzmaster, be aware of the crappy stock bridge. It's a real pain, but there are some workarounds. I replaced it with the StayTrem bridge which costs around 80 bucks. But there are probably cheaper, DIY ways of getting around it.

 

And btw, I've been playing guitar since around September last year, so I'm certainly not an expert on this. Take what I say with a grain of salt. :>


Edited by clirke21, 20 February 2018 - 17:33.


#136 Renoised

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 20:04

You know, I reckon the problem with the string snapping on that vintage Lorenzo I have, could well be down to how it's set up now that you mention these things are designed to be adjustable.  I was basically under the impression that the only thing you adjust on an acoustic is the tuning knobs :badteethslayer:

 

I'll have to bring it down from the loft and have a look at it, cause if I can lower the action on it by adjsutment, and buy steel strings that are softer, then I already have a good guitar.  I was just looking at this pickup as well, it's designed to turn an acoustic into elecro acoustic, and they mention finding a sweet-spot, but how on earth can you do that when the body is enclosed like that - how does it fix inside?  Looks as if it might suck-on, but it would never grip to wood if it was sucked-on.  So then I assume it's some sort of adhesive, but if that's the case, how the hell are you supposed to move it around until you find the sweet spot inside the guitar?

 

Also, one other thing, that acoustic guitar used in the Summer Affair track, I'm assuming that's an acoustic guitar pretty much the same as I already have, unless they had elecro-acoustic back in 1971.  Is there any way to tell how the sound of that guitar was picked-up?  A suspended mic, a contact mic, a piezo mic like in the photo, can you tell from the sound?

 

 

 

Is it one of these thingies attached to an acoustic, do you think?

https://www.ebay.co....jo/380963485550

 

s-l1600.jpg



#137 clirke21

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 22:06

@Renoised: I don't really have a lot of experience with this, but I suspect it was simply picked up with a dynamic microphone, but I could be totally wrong on this. I don't have the ears for that to really tell, because I haven't used piezos or mics to pick up acoustic guitars. You may wanna look for an interview with this guy, perhaps he talks about his production techniques somewhere.

 

I had a little phase in which I was interested in using piezo pickups on my electric-guitar in order to make it sound more acoustic. That's the only kind of application I did some research on. But in the end, I'd rather just record my electric guitar unplugged into a dynamic mic. Check this out: 

 

But yeah, perhaps someone else here knows the answer to that. x)



#138 Renoised

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 23:26

That dude is one slick guitarist, and thanks for the vid (even if I am totally puzzled why you'd record an electric guitar without direct feed from the pickups).  Wouldn't it sound the same but without the room if you did that, or is that why you do it, cause you want some slight room ambience included?

 

Anyway, I'm really glad I asked about it cause I just stumbled upon this video.  I had no idea there were so many ways to do that to an acoustic, and I really love the idea of being able to mix/match/position pickups like that cause it's like designing a guitar to your preference.  I think I might strip the acoustic down and customise it, cause at least that way I would have a genuine vintage guitar, customised to my own liking.  The only thing I'll have to check first (which I'm going to do right now), is how an electrified acoustic guitar compares to a standard electric guitar, for whenever I feel the need to do some Death Metal or Grindcore on it :lol: :D 

Anyway, here's that vid, well worth a watch:



#139 Renoised

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 23:48

Fucking hell, it sounds better than a standard electric!!!
Possibly sounds thicker due to having a chamber (that would make perfect sense actually), but either way, I'm keeping the vintage acoustic and makin' it all black, then I have acoustic and a powerful electric :badteethslayer:



#140 clirke21

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 00:08

@Renoised: I like the tone of it, it's kinda acoustic, but not really. It helps me to make some nods to certain elements of my favorite music etc. There are many reasons as to why i'll use that at some point. (they're also quieter than real acoustic guitars..which helps) And yeah, slight room acoustic is great. Makes it sound more human.

 

Much of Frusciantes 4-track stuff has a lot of background noise in it, him coughing (at some point the coughing wasn't the healthy kind anymore), breathing, his fingers, him taking a huge hit out of a bong, him drinking a glass of water (let's just hope it was water) and swallowing it before starting and some other elements that pickups can't "pick up". That stuff was like a middlefinger to the professionalism in the music business. "Look at me, I play my stuff through a "crappy" 4-track and I'll have my girlfriend giggle over it (and talk backwards gibberish) while I'm playing guitar solos on heroin, but it's still better than your garbage." And it was. Well, I guess not many can pull that off, but he could. Still though, don't take heroin, kids!  :badteeth:

 

The Fishman stuff, yeah, that's what I was considering buying for my hypothetical Telecaster. And I wouldn't have thought that you could make an acoustic do metal, I guess you can do almost anything with it if you just put your mind to it... :clownstep:


Edited by clirke21, 21 February 2018 - 00:10.


#141 Renoised

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 00:53

:clownstep: 



#142 Renoised

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 17:27

I'm convinced that electrified acoustics are basically Satanic devil-boxes with a hole in.

A hole from which the demonic sound can escape, and enter you :yeah:



 



#143 Loolarge

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 14:26

You can be one of those people who look for something new as soon as the initial excitement wears off and things get a bit more difficult. It's nice, because things are always exciting (and dramatic). Or you stick with it for the long-term, even if that means you have to master the plateau, but it'll be more fulfilling in the long run (+ you'll be better at it). I prefer the latter even if my instincts sometimes want me to indulge in the path of least resistance (the first choice).  :clownstep:

 

Resonates with me. I kept buying hardware during the last 2 years and am really struggling to fit it all into one workflow, keep replugging the audio a lot etc.

I hope I'll settle soon. I do have a Yamaha AR1600 multi-track recorder so for today the plan is to make it the midi clock master, connect something midi and record. Delete the bad parts. Rinse and repeat. Appreciate randomness.



#144 El°HYM

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 20:25

Resonates with me. I kept buying hardware during the last 2 years and am really struggling to fit it all into one workflow, keep replugging the audio a lot etc.

I hope I'll settle soon. I do have a Yamaha AR1600 multi-track recorder so for today the plan is to make it the midi clock master, connect something midi and record. Delete the bad parts. Rinse and repeat. Appreciate randomness.

 

A good analog setup should be well thought thru all the way to the end. The prob is mostly you will need to try it out first, before you find out what werx & what doesnt. Its also part of the process I guess...in the end; having something that werx juz fine for you, might then be the exact #workflow you have been looking for.


Inside ur Renoise; helping Byte-Smasher putting Cab Sims on ur Master.  :ph34r: 






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