Note Delay How To Use With Lpb 4

Is there somewhere I can turn to in order to figure out how LPB4 Note Delays work, please? What would be a “halved” access of resolution, what would be 1/16 steps etc?

Huh?

LPB4 with a measure of 4 beats (assuming 4/4 time signature which is most common.)

Sorry was reading 1/16th note then… You mean 1/16 of a line?

00 full line
80 - 1/2
40 - 1/4
20 - 1/8
10 - 1/16

(lefthand hexademical values in Delay colum, right hand “normal” fractions.)

but all that is the same no matter the LPB. Again I find myself struggling to work out precisely what you are trying to ask (no offsense meant and I’ve been suffering from stinking headache, killer throat and ear ache most of the last week so concentrating and figuring things out may not quiet be my strong point at the moment. You could probably add patience to that list too… Plus spelling as I don’t have Firefox to help me today ;) )

Ahh, so it’s the same across all LPB’s! That’s great to know, won’t need to calculate any LPB stuff… I’ll have to try this now and see what happens

But what about 80 - FF?

80 is still 1/2
C0 = 3/4
FF = 1/1 - (1/256)

So is 30 then 1/6?
Are there accurate depictions of what 50, 60, 90, a0, b0 and d0 e0 are, please?

Using the delay column splits the line into 0x100 pieces, so (using kazakore’s notation)
00 -> 0x00/0x100 = no delay
10 -> 0x10/0x100 = delayed by 1/16 of a line
20 -> 0x20/0x100 = delayed by 1/8 of a line

and so on. If the delay column reads YY, then you’re delaying by 0xYY/0x100 of a line.

Some more examples (incl. ones you requested in the above post):
30 - 3/16
40 - 1/4
50 - 5/16
60 - 3/8
70 - 7/16
80 - 1/2
90 - 9/16
a0 - 5/8
b0 - 11/16
c0 - 3/4
d0 - 13/16
e0 - 7/8
f0 - 15/16
ff - 255/256

If you wanted to approximate 1/6 with the delay column, you would use 2B (1/6 * 256 = 42.67 ~= 43 = 0x2B). Note that you wouldn’t be delaying by exactly 1/6 of a line, rather by 43/256 of a line, but given reasonable LPB (4) and BPM (130) settings, that’s only a difference of 0.00015 seconds - pretty close. If you decrease the BPM or the LPB, the error gets larger but is still probably not noticable - at an LPB of 1 and a BPM of 32, the difference between 1/6 and 43/256 of a line is only 0.0024 seconds.