Seriously, Facebook?!?!?

image #WTFFB

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This is seriously messed up.
When i see stuff like that i calm myself down by thinking of the internet as it was in 1998 - basically no ads, no redundant stuff like facebook or twitter and the the world felt much more sane and simpler.
Ahh…good times.

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Damn. That hurts. I’m going to go get my anger out playing my obsolete video game systems. My 2600 still works flawlessly and so does renoise. :metal:

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“Obsolete music software” (picture of Ableton Live)
“because you viewed Ableton”

Jk jk lol

But seriously, why does everyone use Ableton? XD
I think mostly they just have good ad campaigns. And people probably love the focus on using MIDI pads, as that’s pretty popular nowadays.

It’s not a bad program, but neither is Renoise!

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I apologize for being a bit sentimental here.

Just a personal preference, but (after 28 years) i still find trackers to be the most intuitive and effective way to record, edit and view music (besides recording via MIDI).
Sure, your milage may vary.

I can see why people want features like a piano roll but that is a bit contrary to the tracker concept.

If you grew up with the C64 or Amiga, chances are you came across a tracker.
And i would go so far and say that they even dominated the computer-music scene for quite some time, spread around the world and were basically free to use.

Sure, everyone should use the tools which fit their needs, but not everyone knows the right tools.
And since people fall for hype and hipsterism, how can they?
As stated before, depending on one´s lifestyle - many things are redundant and overrated, but some are not - and it is not that obvious.
Unfortunately, marketing was always playing a big role in what people would buy and use but that never applied to trackers because their users were different to begin with.

So nowadays, to most computer-musicians, trackers are an unknown concept.
And if it wasn´t for Renoise for example - it would be even less known.

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Obsolete trackers exist. Many people come to Renoise because they used those obsolete trackers at some point. Some Renoise users who never used trackers before are interested in early tracker software. The FB algorithms have therefore determined there is some significant chance that you’ll be interested in that group.

I’m not sure what there is to be bothered about, other than FB doing what FB does best.

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I actually came to Renoise after starting with Ableton. At the time I liked the flexibility that their time stretching algorithm provided, but I only really ended up using it at a very surface level. The software updates are FOOKING expensive, and many essential features are only available at higher tiered licenses. I just discovered I could do so much more with Renoise at a much lower price point, and that the tracker workflow makes it easier to finish songs.
I think it’s far from obsolete, and am happy to see where we go from here!

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That’s a good way of looking at it, and it’s certainly true for me. I was new to trackers when I discovered Renoise, but it’s inspired me to learn more about the history of trackers and check out some of the other ones. None have seriously tempted me away, but there’s a lot to learn from the diverse community around them.

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Agreed. and more generally it’s apparent that trackers attract people who think a certain way (you don’t have to look very hard on these forums to find software developers, after all). The kind of person who is drawn to the efficient and uniquely ‘under the hood’ vibe inherent to trackers is very likely the kind of person who would do a bit of digging to better understand the legacy of their tools.

I doubt it applies to everyone of course, but it’d be interesting to see a survey of Renoise users to find out what other similarities there are. :upside_down_face:

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Quite a few of those people around here also have a demoscene background for example (besides being programmers) :slightly_smiling_face:

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I downloaded a Renoise demo as my first DAW (based on affordability) but when I couldn’t even figure out how to input a note, I uninstalled it, and switched to Ableton, sticking with it for about a year and half X) then moved to FL Studio, and fell in love with the piano roll there, as well as some cool features like ‘dump score log to selected pattern’ and amazing synths like Harmor. Stayed there for like 2 years, and then wanted to try Renoise after hearing some of the music coming out of trackers like it, and fell even deeper in love with it than I did with FL haha
Today I use both Renoise and FL back and forth. They’re both too fun to pick just one :smiley:

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