Impulse Tracker Biography Book and other goodies

Hello Renoisers,

Seasons greetings to all of you. I have been reading the following books this month, and they are very nice works.

Impulse Tracker, Ovi Demetrian Jr.

  1. https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9781447154921

Hacking Europe

Any other books you guys might know, let us what here.

Cheers!

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Oh shit I know Ovi. We haven’t spoken in quite some time, because I became (essentially) a hermit (for assorted reasons).

He’s a very cool guy, I’ve got his Lifehacks graphic novel (signed by both he and the artist, so I’m extra cool).

I had no idea he was into trackers, let alone that he would write freakin book about Impulse. Live and learn.

He built and runs this site: https://indieaisle.com/

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Wow, that is some good news indeed, thank you for the inputs. I really like his Impluse Tracker book and I am already checking out his other works.

Btw would you care to share how living as a hermit feels like and who or what were the influences that directed you in this path and lifestyle:-)

:slight_smile:

I’m not strictly a hermit. I was a bit facetious.

A few years ago I decided to stay home rather than continue going out to assorted social gatherings (hacker meetups, artist groups, local cons), and spend more time with my wife and focus on my art and music.

So I lost contact with everyone except immediate family and a handful of close friends (all but one living out of state).

I’m sure there’s a better word than “hermit” for this but I couldn’t think of it.

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Sounds good, it just means you are enjoying your family and personal time. You have kids or you don’t like so many nowadays? How would having kids affect ones married life and social life?

I’ve read the short story today, due to the title I first thought that was a biography of Jeffrey Lim, the Impulse Tracker creator. That was not, but I’ve appreciated the ambiance, reminded me the 90’.

That could have been me during this period. ^^

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Yea it is a nice short story, and I wish it was longer and also about the originators of the tracker. But after reading the dense tome Hacking Europe, I am glad it was a lighter read. The historical accounts are very detailed and the chapter on the hacking scene in Yugoslavia almost made me feel nostalgic about a nation that is not around any more, but the presence can be felt even then. It is amazing how Europeans appropriated American technologies and how France felt sympathetic for Yugoslavia after political upheavals and sent world class researchers and scientists to help build a new economy using computer technology and make it a home grown industry. Being a computer guy or hacker here was a party Kool thing rather than how it was in America where nerds had a hard social time even as a stereotype. Poland and Yugoslavia actually partied hard and learnt computing by nearly smuggling computers from borders in neighboring countries or in German markets. It is an amazing side I never would imagine unless someone told me about it. European computers are relica of a time when governments were motivated towards progress and educating their population. Microsoft eventually took over much of the market and Netherlands became the first country to adopt and welcome this new technology en masse. We all know how Germany was always had a hacker scene with the Chaos Computer Club, and it is a fascinating fact that Pixel magazine was a major force in the Greek hacking scene. Even Czech Republic invented infrared machines to build wireless networks because of local laws and landlords prohibiting cables and lights installations. Politics, market forces, including the demise of Commodore because of stronger competition, local markets and a far more encouraging culture made the Demoscene ubiquitous (especially in Finland) and even parts of America and Japan but far less in comparison. It is a great read if you find it for free or pay the hefty price(totally worth it), it’s also for folks who use trackers or are interested in computing history. There is not a lot of music tracker related details except the words ‘voice tracker’ mentioned as a software used by one of the protagonists. It is Demoscene specific not technology specific.

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where are you from bro? where can i find more stories regarding that ‘Yugoslavian’ ‘hacking’ era. i’m quite young :P.
very interesting read :slight_smile:

Yo bro, I am from India, which ironically has no Demoscene whatsoever. I am not a very local kind of person to begin with because I had a very international upbringing. But as I would like to know more and more about computer cyber culture scenes, I am fascinated by the computer culture in Europe especially. All this info about Yugoslavia can be found in the book Hacking Europe released in 2014. I can try to post the bibliography over here (can’t post any full links or material becos @deepblue will cancel it)

Excerpts from the book;

Chapter 5 Galaxy and the New Wave: Yugoslav Computer Culture in the 1980s Bruno Jakić

1 Economist. 1984 . Yugoslavia. In The world in fi gures , 240–242. London: MacMillan. For an impression of daily life in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia 1945–1990, see: Edin Veladžić, Goran Miloradović, et al. 2010 . Yugoslavia between East and West; Ordinary people in unordinary country . Online project EUROCLIO – HIP http://www.cliohip.com . Accessed 24 Nov 2011. B. Jakić ( *) Independent researcher, University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands e-mail: bruno@ai-applied.nl

2 Interview author with Gordana Radević, M.D. in Belgrade, a student of medicine in Sarajevo 1985–1990, July 18, 2010. 3Interview author with Rafo Dužnović, Vareš, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Summer of 2009. 4Interviews author with Darko and Andrej Šolar, Sombor, Serbia, early 1994 and Novi Sad, Serbia, July 13, 2009. 5This chapter has been based on magazines Galaksija , Svet Kompjutera , PC Pres , Džuboks , Polet , and Ilustrovana Politika as well as the online resources and recollections by Zoran Modli, a Yugoslav counterculture icon from the 1980s, ( http://www.modli.rs/ . Accessed 20 Feb 2011); “Srbima Treba Vremeplov,” Interview with Zoran Modli, Feral Tribune , Split, Croatia, June 23, 2006; recollections of Dejan Ristanović, Yugoslav 1980s home computing pioneer. http://www. dejanristanovic.com . Accessed 23 Sept 2010; documentary fi lm “Sretno Dijete” about the New Wave in Yugoslavia (Zagreb, Croatia, 2003). 6 William Zimmerman. 1987 . Open borders, non-alignment and the political evolution of Yugoslavia . Princeton: Princeton University Press; Sabrina P. Ramet. 2006 . The three Yugoslavias: State- building and legitimation, 1918–2005 . Bloomington: University of Indiana Press.

Zimmerman  in   1972   sketched the Yugoslavia’s restricted room to maneuver in terms of Rothstein’s concept of “small power,” bound to short terms policies.  William Zimmerman.   1972 .  Hierarchical regional systems and the politics of system boundaries.   International  Organization   26(1): 18–36, here 30. Robert L. Rothstein.   1968 .    Alliances and small powers . New York: Columbia University Press. 8      Gary K. Bertsch, and  Thomas  W. Ganschow.   1976 .    Comparative communism:  The Soviet, Chinese, and  Yugoslav models , 131–133. San Francisco:  W.H. Freeman. 9    Untypical of Zimmerman’s “small power” behavior,  Yugoslavia succeeded in creating an international milieu for what Dulić  and Kostić  refer to as “socialist self-management.” It developed such long term policies as a defense industry. Zimmerman, Hierarchical regional systems and the  politics of system boundaries, 30.  Tornislav Dulić, and Roland Kostić.   2010 .  Yugoslavs  in arms: Guerrilla tradition, total defence and the ethnic security dilemma.   Europe-Asia  Studies   62(7): 1051–1072, here 1052. J. Barryman.   1988 .  The Soviet Union and Yugoslavia’s defence and   foreign policy. In    Yugoslavia’s security dilemmas—Armed forces, national defence and foreign policy , ed. M. Milivojević, J.B.  Allcock, and P. Maurer, 192–260. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 

Glenn E. Curtis. 1990 . Yugoslavia: A country study . Washington, DC: Library of Congress, Federal Research Division. William C. Potter, Djuro Miljanić, and Ivo Slaus. 2000 . Tito’s nuclear legacy. Bulletin of Atomic Scientists 56(2): 63–70. 11 The organization and funding of Yugoslav scientifi c programs with (semi-)military purposes has traditionally suffered from intentional lack of transparency, as indicated by Robert J. Walen, Stevan Dedijer, and Pavle Savić of IBK Vinča. 1953 . O dva bitna uslova za razvitak atomske energije kod nas . Belgrade. However, the institutes receiving funding from the defense budget were the fi rst to initiate research and production of automatic computers in Yugoslavia. 12 For the nuclear aspect of this institute, see Potter, Miljanić, and Slaus, Tito’s nuclear legacy. 13 R. Tomović, A. Mandžić, and T. Aleksić, et al. 1960 . Cifarski Elektronski Računar CER10 IBK Vinča. ETAN-1960 1:305–330.

14 Marvin Perry, Myrna Chase, and Margaret C. Jacob, et al. 2007 . Western civilization: Ideas, politics, and society , 860–865. Boston: Wadsworth. 15 Jelica Protić, and Dejan Ristanović. 2011 . Building computers in Serbia: The fi rst half of the digital century. Computer Science and Information Systems 8(3): 549–571. 16 Tomović, Mandžić, and Aleksić et al., Cifarski Elektronski Računar CER10 IBK Vinča. 17 Vladan Batanović, and Jovan Kon. 2006 . IMP Riznica znanja , 25–28. Belgrade: M. Pupin Institute and PKS. 18 Milan Mesarić. 1971 . Suvremena znanstveno tehnička revolucija . Zagreb: Ekonomski institut. 19 See: CIA’s overview in the annual World factbook (Washington, DC: Central Intelligence Agency, 1975).

National Computer Industry in Socialist Yugolavia . CER-10 (Cifarski Elektronski Racunar 10—Numerical Electronic Calculator 10) was the fi rst computer designed and built in the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, used from 1961 to 1967. Yugoslavia’s geopolitical position at the time, sandwiched between the forces of the NATO on one side and the Warsaw Pact on the other, while being a member of neither and potentially hostile to both, prompted the government to make large-scale investments in the development of domestic military, scientifi c, and industrial sectors. Domestic computer development was one of the priorities, resulting in a long line of domestically built CER machines. These computers were used for scientifi c, military, and business purposes over the next 30 years. Operated by highly trained specialists, they were not accessible to ordinary citizens. Source: Image by Dusan Hristovic, in the public domain

Patrick H. Patterson. 2006 . Dangerous liaisons: Soviet-Bloc tourists and the Yugoslav good life in the 1960s and 1970s. In The business of tourism: Place, faith and history , ed. Philip Scranton and Janet F. Davidson, 186–212. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Patterson, Patrick H. 2003 . Consumer culture, the new ‘New Class,’ and the making of the Yugoslav dream, 1950–1965 . Paper presented at states and social transformation in Eastern Europe 1945–1965. London: The Open University Conference Center. 22 Protić and Ristanović, Building computers in Serbia. 23 Ibid. 24 New Scientist Technology Review. 1971 . Yugoslavia Grows Ripe for computer boom. New Scientist and Science Journal 51(768): 576. 25 Yugoslavia Grows Ripe.

Protić and Ristanović, Building computers in Serbia. 27 D. Abramovitch. 2005 . Analog computing in the Soviet Union. An interview with Boris Kogan. IEEE Control Systems 25(3): 52–62. 28 Nikola Markovic. 2009 . E-Potencijali Srbije nr1. CEPiT E-volucija , 3–11. Belgrade: Studeni. 29 Patrick H. Patterson. 2009 . Making markets Marxist? The East European grocery store from rationing to rationality to rationalizations. In Food chains: From farmyard to shopping cart , ed. Warren Belasco and Roger Horowitz, 196–216. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania. 30 Patterson, Dangerous liaisons. 31 Petar Janjatović. 1998 . Ilustrovana Enciklopedija Yu Rocka 1960–1997 . Belgrade: Geopoetika

Margit Rosen. 2011 . A little-known story about a movement, a magazine, and the computer’s arrival in art; New tendencies and bit international, 1961–1973 . Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 33 Holm Sundhaussen. 2012 . Jugoslawien und seine Nachfolgestaaten 1943–2011. Eine ungewöhnliche Geschichte des Gewöhnlichen . Wien: Böhlau. See especially the section “Vom Dogmatismus zur Verwestlichung der Kulturszene”, 148–151. 34 Time magazine. 1972. Yugoslavia: The specter of separatism. TIME Magazine , February 7, 1972.

Central Intelligence Agency. 1990 . World factbook . Washington, DC: Central Intelligence Agency. 36 Marie-Janine Calic. 2011 . The beginning of the end: The 1970s as a historical turning point in Yugoslavia. In The crisis of socialist modernity. The Soviet Union and Yugoslavia in the 1970s , ed. Marie-Janine Calic, Dietmar Neutatz, and Julia Obertreis, 66–86, here 76. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht. 37 Harold Lydall. 1989 . Yugoslavia in crisis , 102–105. Oxford: Clarendon. Calic, The beginning of the end, 79. 38 “US Policy toward Eastern Europe,” National Security Decision Directive NSDD-54 and NSDD- 133 (partially declassifi ed in 1990).

Predrag Marković, ‘Where have all the fl owers gone?’ – Yugoslav culture in the 1970s, in Calic, Neutatz, and Obertreis, The crisis of socialist modernity , 118–133. 40 Sergei Zhuk. 2010 . Rock and roll in the Rocket City: The West, identity and ideology in Soviet Dnepropetrovsk . Washington, DC: Woodrow Wilson Center Press. 41 Dalibor Misina. 2008 . ‘Who’s that singing over there?’ Yugoslav rock-music and the poetics of social critique . PhD thesis, University of Alberta, Alberta; Thomas Taylor Hammond. 1954 . Yugoslavia between East and West . Washington, DC: Foreign Policy Association.

Tjebbe van Tijen (ed.). 1989 . Europe against the current: Catalogue on alternative, independent and radical information carriers . Amsterdam: IISG; Tjebbe van Tijen. 1990 . Europa tegen de stroom. De Gids 153(6): 466–471; John K. Cox. 2005 . Slovenia: Evolving loyalties , 77. London: Routledge. 43 Interviews with Gordana Radević; with Rafo Dužnović; with Darko and Andrej Šolar. Cf note 2, 3, 4.

44 Interview author with Gordana Radević (cf note 2); interview author with Zdravko Jakić, Amsterdam, Netherlands, September 19, 2010. 45 Interview author with Djordje Jovanović, co-owner of such a small fi rm in 1984, Belgrade, Serbia, July 24, 2009.

Dejan Ristanović, http://www.dejanristanovic.com/rac1.htm . Accessed 23 Sept 2010. 47 Protić and Ristanović, Building computers in Serbia. 48 Voja Antonić. 1983 . Galaksija . http://www.paralax.rs/pr83.htm . Accessed 17 June 2010. 49 Ratko Bošković. 1984 . Kako je rodjena Galaksija. Magazine Start , February, 25–26. 50 Protić and Ristanović, Building computers in Serbia.

Galaksija designer, Voja Antonic, in a Yugoslav Homebrewing Scene . The Galaksija home computer was designed and prototyped by Voja Antonic ( right ), who was well known in Yugoslavia at the time as an electronics engineer and science publicist. Antonic is photographed here testing one the fi rst Galaksija’s with a friend. The design and schematics for the computer were published in the Racunari u vasoj kuci ( Computers in your home ) magazine in late 1983. So was a list of parts, which could either be bought in most electronic stores or ordered as a kit. From the very start, Antonic’s vision was to create an affordable computer that would both educate ordinary people about how computers work by having the experience of assemble assembling one as well as let them explore the potential of computers and software. Many users went on to share self-made computer programs and games for the machine through a variety of channels. Source: Image from personal collection Voja Antonic, under Creative Commons license

Ibid. Recollections of Zoran Modli. http://www.modli.rs/ . Accessed 20 Feb 2011.

Galaksija home computers were usually self-assembled by their users and did not come with a computer case. Sometimes parts were used that were compatible but not specifi ed in the original design. While recommendations for computer case design were supplied in the original design documentation, some users chose not to use a case for the computer at all, as seen here on the image on the top . Other users customized their Galaksija cases to refl ect their individual preferences, like the design shown in the image on the bottom , giving expression to their individuality through yet another medium. Of the approximately 10,000 Galaksija computers assembled, most acquired distinct looks, created by their users. Source: Courtesy Old-computers.com

Zoran Modli. 2011 . Ventilator 202 recollections . http://www.modli.rs/radio/ventilator/ventilator. html . Accessed 20 Feb 2011. 53 Antonić, Galaksija .

Protić and Ristanović, Building computers in Serbia. 55 Cox, Slovenia ; interviews author with Darko and Andrej Šolar; Wikipedia contributions by Aleksandar Šušnjar. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_computer_hardware_in_the_SFRY . Accessed 21 Feb 2011. 56 Protić and Ristanović, Building computers in Serbia.

Interviews author with Gordana Radević; with Rafo Dužnović; with Darko and Andrej Šolar, note 2, 3, 4. 58 Marie-José Klaver. 1998 . De digitale vluchtweg. NRC Handelsblad , October 29. CFJE. 1999. CFJE Joins Campaign to support Radio B92 in Belgrade. CJFE News Release , March 26, 1999; Marie-José Klaver. 1999 . Boem, boem uit de chatroom. NRC Handelsblad , May 17.

Bibliography Abramovitch, D. 2005. Analog computing in the Soviet Union. An interview with Boris Kogan. IEEE Control Systems 25(3): 52–62. Antonić, Voja. 1983. Galaksija . http://www.paralax.rs/pr83.htm . Accessed 17 June 2010. Barryman, J. 1988. The Soviet Union and Yugoslavia’s defence and foreign policy. In Yugoslavia’s security dilemmas – Armed forces, national defence and foreign policy , ed. M. Milivojevic, J.B. Allcock, and P. Maurer, 192–260. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Batanović, Vladan, and Jovan Kon. 2006. IMP Riznica znanja . Belgrade: M. Pupin Institute and PKS. Bertsch, Gary K., and Thomas W. Ganschow. 1976. Comparative communism: The Soviet, Chinese, and Yugoslav models . San Francisco: W.H. Freeman. Bošković, Ratko. 1984. Kako je rodjena Galaksija. Magazine Start , February, 25–26. Calic, Marie-Janine. 2011. The beginning of the end: The 1970s as a historical turning point in Yugoslavia. In The crisis of socialist modernity. The Soviet Union and Yugoslavia in the 1970s , ed. Marie-Janine Calic, Dietmar Neutatz, and Julia Obertreis, 66–86. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht. Central Intelligence Agency. 1990. World factbook . Washington, DC: Central Intelligence Agency. Cox, John K. 2005. Slovenia: Evolving loyalties . London: Routledge. Curtis, Glenn E. 1990. Yugoslavia: A country study . Washington, DC: Library of Congress, Federal Research Division. Dulić, Tornislav, and Roland Kostić. 2010. Yugoslavs in arms: Guerrilla tradition, total defence and the ethnic security dilemma. Europe-Asia Studies 62(7): 1051–1072. Economist. 1984. Yugoslavia. In The world in fi gures , 240–242. London: MacMillan. Hammond, Thomas Taylor. 1954. Yugoslavia between East and West . Washington, DC: Foreign Policy Association. Janjatović, Petar. 1998. Ilustrovana Enciklopedija Yu Rocka 1960–1997 . Belgrade: Geopoetika. Klaver, Marie-José. 1998. De Digitale Vluchtweg. NRC Handelsblad , October 29. Klaver, Marie-José. 1999. Boem, boem uit de chatroom. NRC Handelsblad , May 17. Lydall, Harold. 1989. Yugoslavia in crisis . Oxford: Clarendon. Markovic, Nikola. 2009. E-Potencijali Srbije nr1. CEPiT E-volucija , 3–11. Belgrade: Studeni. Marković, Predrag. 2011. ‘Where have all the fl owers gone?’ – Yugoslav culture in the 1970s. In The crisis of socialist modernity. The Soviet Union and Yugoslavia in the 1970s , ed. Marie-Janine Calic, Dietmar Neutatz, and Julia Obertreis, 118–133. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht. Mesarić, Milan. 1971. Suvremena znanstveno tehnička revolucija . Zagreb: Ekonomski institut. Misina, Dalibor. 2008. ‘Who’s that singing over there?’ Yugoslav rock-music and the poetics of social critique. PhD thesis, University of Alberta, Alberta. Modli, Zoran. 2011. Ventilator 202 recollections . http://www.modli.rs/radio/ventilator/ventilator. html . Accessed 20 Feb 2011. New Scientist Technology Review. 1971. Yugoslavia Grows Ripe for computer boom. New Scientist and Science Journal 51(768): 576. Patterson, Patrick H. 2003. Consumer culture, the new ‘New Class,’ and the making of the Yugoslav dream, 1950–1965 . Paper presented at states and social transformation in Eastern Europe 1945–1965. London: The Open University Conference Center. Patterson, Patrick H. 2006. Dangerous liaisons: Soviet-bloc tourists and the Yugoslav good life in the 1960s and 1970s. In The business of tourism: Place, faith and history , ed. Philip Scranton and Janet F. Davidson, 186–212. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. Patterson, Patrick H. 2009. Making markets Marxist? The East European grocery store from rationing to rationality to rationalizations. In Food chains: From farmyard to shopping cart , ed. Warren Belasco and Roger Horowitz, 196–216. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. Perry, Marvin, Myrna Chase, Margaret C. Jacob, et al. 2007. Western civilization: Ideas, politics, and society . Boston: Wadsworth. Potter, William C., Djuro Miljanić, and Ivo Slaus. 2000. Tito’s nuclear legacy. Bulletin of Atomic Scientists 56(2): 63–70. Protić, Jelica, and Dejan Ristanović. 2011. Building computers in Serbia: The fi rst half of the digital century. Computer Science and Information Systems 8(3): 549–571. Ramet, Sabrina P. 2006. The three Yugoslavias: State-building and legitimation, 1918–2005 . Bloomington: University of Indiana Press. Rosen, Margit. 2011. A little-known story about a movement, a magazine, and the computer’s arrival in art; New tendencies and bit international, 1961–1973 . Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Rothstein, Robert L. 1968. Alliances and small powers . New York: Columbia University Press. Sundhaussen, Holm. 2012. Jugoslawien und seine Nachfolgestaaten 1943–2011. Eine ungewöhnliche Geschichte des Gewöhnlichen . Wien: Böhlau. T o m o v i ć, R., A. Mandžić, T. Aleksić, et al. 1960. Cifarski Elektronski Računar CER10 IBK Vinča. ETAN-1960 1: 305–330. van Tijen, Tjebbe (ed.). 1989. Europe against the current: Catalogue on alternative, independent and radical information carriers . Amsterdam: IISG. van Tijen, Tjebbe. 1990. Europa tegen de stroom. De Gids 153(6): 466–471. Veladžić, Edin, Goran Miloradović, et al. 2010. Yugoslavia between East and West; Ordinary people in unordinary country . Online project EUROCLIO – HIP http://www.cliohip.com . Accessed 24 Nov 2011. Walen, Robert J., Stevan Dedijer, and Pavle Savić of IBK Vinča. 1953. O dva bitna uslova za razvitak atomske energije kod nas . Belgrade, Yugoslavia. Zhuk, Sergei. 2010. Rock and roll in the Rocket City: The West, identity and ideology in Soviet Dnepropetrovsk . Washington, DC: Woodrow Wilson Center Press. Zimmerman, William. 1972. Hierarchical regional systems and the politics of system boundaries. International Organization 26(1): 18–36. Zimmerman, William. 1987. Open borders, non-alignment and the political evolution of Yugoslavia . Princeton: Princeton University Press.f

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About Impulse Tracker’s book. Is there any way to read it in Spanish format?
I am particularly interested. I grew up composing music with the Impulse Tracker by Jeffrey Lim. I guess this programmer will now be old, with a cane and contact lenses :slight_smile: but it opened an entire era along with other programmers of the time.

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sorry for remedy regarding impulse tracker, but this is awesome. Where can i find the book to buy?
I’m from Serbia, and hence the interest.
Thank you!

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To reassure you, it’s only around 8 pages, it’s more a short novel than a full big book.
It’s good for training reading english too. :slight_smile:

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I intended to share it with some friends in my native language. But if it is in English, better than not.

You can get it for free from the Google Play link and other similar ebook shops. About Spanish I don’t know yet. But it is a good practice to improve your English and for all who would like to read something entertaining, informative and relevant.

No children. My wife was developing some health issues, and I saw the importance of being with her as much as I could while I could.

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If it can be read online then one can try reading the English and use Google Translate (or similar) to translate and see if you got it right. (Caveat: GT does not always get things right : ) ).

I do that stuff like that to improve my German (I’m native English-speaking).

(Kindle is pretty good for that sort of stuff too, easy to have it translate selections of text.)

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A tracker hardcopy book in Czech language or Cestina as they call it. It reads more like a user manual printout and less of an instructional book. But nonetheless its an item of interest for sure. I really want to rekindle the Renoise book/ebook project sometime very soon.

TOC:

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First Page:

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I am staying in Europe and for work in Prague and Brno regions, been to Scandinavia/Germany/Slovakia/Vienna in the past 8 months. I am yet to visit a Demoscene festival but this year looks ripe for that.

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