Using mono vs stereo samples?

What are the benefits with regards to using mono over stereo (or vice versa)? I’ve recently started mixing my samples into mono and I’ve found that it has made balancing volumes and eqing stuff a lot easier outside the loss of panning effects that were natural to the sample. Also, is there a way to set Renoise to automatically format your samples to mono/mixed via a script or something like that?

Mono files tend to be smaller than stereo.

You can use the stereo expander to make a signal mono in the device chain. (I often put this on the master channel and listen to mixes in mono).

If your track has multiple samples, or things you do not want mono then I don’t know.

Also, is there a way to set Renoise to automatically format your samples to mono/mixed via a script or something like that?

http://www.renoise.com/tools/batch-convert-stereo-to-mono

I’ve found it pretty useful for processing samples, especially things with bass to low mid range frequencies. Makes them easier to hear in the mix and more punchy (IMO)

I produce, record, mix and print everything in mono down to even completed tracks because I love the way it sounds. Two symetric metering bars all over the place is what I see all the time. All my tracks have the Stereo Expander set to mono, including Sends and Master. I believe my music is bidimensional. This way I only worry about frequency (from high to low) and volume (from front to back). My Spectrum Analyzer shows absolutely nothing on the sides. That’s because I enjoy the feeling that my songs can sound the same on either 1 or 2 speakers (just louder on the latter). Everything I produce is dead center. I never touch the pan knobs. I really don’t know the implications of not taking advantage of the stereo image during mixing.

Most time I use (or convert from stereo) mono samples/sounds for drums and the more lowranged instruments like bass. Once my arrangement is done, I set my audio interface to mono and mix everything on that image. When I turn back the audio interface to stereo, everything falls even more in place. This way my tracks can be listened on both systems, mono and stereo, without any lose of sound.

I produce, record, mix and print everything in mono down to even completed tracks because I love the way it sounds.

That’s really interesting… I produce and record everything in mono, too. I just like how solid it sounds - and I feel the song more than some fancy FX tricks.

It also means that when I mix, I have solid parts to work with… and I can add a bit of stereo spice here and there.

But I always forget to do anything stereo! :smiley: I don’t even pan… just levels and eq, and print the mix. Afterwards I think, “Dang I forgot to make anything stereo! Oh well, it’s done now…”

I suspect that as I do more mixes, I’ll do more stereo stuff. But I definitely like working with mono for most of the time, because it helps me get a solid sound, focused on the song.