Which Frequency (hz) Is Bad For Ear?


#1

Which Frequency (Hz) is bad for ear?

Reason i ask this is because i saw an article long time ago about mastering and lowering certain frequencies (like mid range ones and maybe other ones) because if set too high its bad for your ear when played out loud for example like on a tranceparty. :walkman:


#2

Circa 3k


#3

Any frequency if loud enough will damage.

See here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fletcher–Munson_curves


#4

I think what he means where does the human ear and hearing peak at. I can handle 150db of 30hz fine, but not at 3k.


#5

2.8-3k bugs me … dunno why.


#6

…hence my first post, because that is the most responsive section of human hearing.


#7

2.8 , 3k thx…

Ok well let me put it in a different way.

what is still the worst frequency (hz) for your ears when its not so loud?


#8

140dB is when sounds can easily cause major damage to your hearing, which would be equivalent to a gunshot at close range, or standing near to a jet engine. Low frequency sounds at this amplitude are especially damaging, because they carry more energy. If you were to listen to 30hz at 150dB, you’d probably destroy your hearing quite quickly.

http://www.abelard.org/hear/hear.php


#9

And easily as low frequencies are usually not painful or irritating, in which high frequencies can be because you usually automatically respond to loud high frequencies. So the lower frequencies are dangerous for more less obvious reasons.


#10

Well, I own two vehicles, one max’s out at 158db and the other 168db, and I can handle sub 155 fine (all sub 60hz), and my hearing is still spot on, obviously or I wouldnt be able to do what I do.

Like I said, our ear follows a curve, and our hearing is -70db down from 3k to 20hz, due to our ears not having a natural resonance at those frequencies.


#11

I’m still quite skeptical, but I suppose it’s possible that you actually enter these cars into sound competitions? Are your cars ridiculously customised bass machines?

If not, then I have to wonder how exactly did you measure the sound levels, because what you’re saying here is that your car is capable of Guinness world record breaking levels.

Here’s an example of 159dB:

PYnYg_G6AZ8

Does your 158dB car do this?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DB_drag_racing

According to this article:

After looking through various sources, I find that they all say pretty much the same thing - sound at these kind of levels is extremely damaging.

It doesn’t really matter what frequencies we can or can’t hear, the damaging thing is the huge pressure waves smashing into your ear drums.


#12

Well, we all mention the sound pressure and frequency rate, but there is also an amount of time that you can hold that pressure before the damage (or deteriorate process) starts to initialize.
The soundpressure level removes the frequency level that should be watched for:

http://www.hearinglosshelp.com/weblog/wp-print.php?p=170
http://www.soundadvice.info/thewholestory/san1.htm


#13

Yes, Ive competed in UK and European SPL contests for over 10 years. The 168.8 one was a Euro record holder for a year, 2 subs.

181 is the current world record, a whole galaxy away from 168, and a millenia away from 158.

Also, the hair trick is nothing to do with volume, that’s because she is sitting directly in front of the port of the enclosure, you can pull that off way down to about 130db if you select the resonant frequency of the enclosure/subwoofer setup.


#14

Hahahah. Well ok then! We probably could have saved a bit of time by getting to this sooner. :) :panic:

I still find it quite interesting that you manage to tolerate such extreme levels without any serious negative effects. Do you have super-human ear drums or something? :D


#15

Its loud ‘physically’ as in the sheer pressure and air movement, but its not actually agravating the ear drums -tho to be honest It can tickle sometimes, but its not ‘pain’ as associated with high frequencies.


#16

Well, now I know where I’m going next time I need to sound check some dancefloor tunes :D :w00t: Although Newcastle to Colchester is a bit of a journey…


#17

Recently bought the Behringer HPS5000 monitor headphones… they have good bass but awful mid/high range sound (hurts my ears almost) with everything i play and very uncomfortable. so im sending them back.

Might try the Sennheiser EH-350 ones.


#18

tinnitus
hyperacusis

I remember Noisuf-X had either an album or track called tinnitus, it was that memory I had to recall in order to name what the hell I was constantly hearing in my ears. Thanks for the links… I never had any real proper education on sound, just picked it up over the years and the dangers of it wasn’t really a concern until the symptoms poped up. As of late though, I listen at low volumes since there are days or nights where I listen for about 4 to 6 and sometimes up to 8 hours of sound. Breaks are nice.


#19

Wikipedia says:

“Amplification of sound by the pinna, tympanic membrane and middle ear causes an increase in level of about 10 to 15 dB in a frequency range of 1.5 kHz to 7 kHz

That’s some serious amplification!

As for insane volumes, the loudest SPL you can have on Earth is 194dB, because the troughs of the wave will a total vacuum!

Cars make it easier to produce very high SPLs because they represent a very small volume of air for the speakers to move. But take the car soundsystem out of the car and it would be very underwhelming!

Professional loudspeakers are generally a lot more sensitive and take advantage of techniques such as horn loading. If you put two of these in your car you’d probably be killed: http://www.voidaudio.com/product_detail.asp?id=76

:lol:

While we’re on the subject of loud noises, here’s the soundsystem I run with my mate:

139dB @ 50Hz :D


#20

No wonder some use music as a weapon… regarding the recent Guantanamo Bay Naval Base music torture. I’m sure such techniques were used in the past, I guess now we just have it variety.