John Frusciante names Renoise as his DAW of choice

http://www.guitarplayer.com/artists/1013/john-frusciante-shifts-from-avant-pop-to-hip-hop/31095

"Briefly describe the ways in which you use technology to realize the music that you are hearing in your head.

Renoise is my main DAW, and I also use some drum machines, sequencers, and other hardware, along with my Doepfer, Arp, and other modular synthesizers. A lot of the pieces on PBX and Enclosure began as guitar ideas, and I developed them from there—but some began with me just sitting in the studio with a computer and various devices."

awesome to hear that, like his new stuff so much

Hell yes!

nice interview too. loved what he said about creative process and verstaility… what nickname is he ? :slight_smile:

This is really cool, especially that he’s specifically interested in being off the grid, it’s what most people (myself included) think renoise tends to specifically be bad at. Inspiring to hear a professional making it work for them.

This is really cool, especially that he’s specifically interested in being off the grid, it’s what most people (myself included) think renoise tends to specifically be bad at. Inspiring to hear a professional making it work for them.

I think Renoise is great at getting off the grid. You can set up a high LPB + you’ve got the delay column.

It may look like it sticks to a grid, but you have ultimate control of where you place sounds in time.

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Yes I use it like that as well sometimes, the problem is it doesn’t work well in a multiscale way.

This is great for micro-edits, but then you can only see 1 or 2 beats of music at a time. You can get proficient at working in this way, but it definitely ups the cognitive overhead of keeping track of the track.

The new instrument tracks with independent LPB can help, as can the matrix view, but it’s a bit of a workaround hack for capturing workflow at 2 or 3 scales, rather than a unified general design principle…

I think Renoise is great at getting off the grid. You can set up a high LPB + you’ve got the delay column.

It may look like it sticks to a grid, but you have ultimate control of where you place sounds in time.

I will listen to this album tonight on Itunes.

This is really cool, especially that he’s specifically interested in being off the grid, it’s what most people (myself included) think renoise tends to specifically be bad at. Inspiring to hear a professional making it work for them.

I thought he means this figuratively, like Renoise itself being ‘off the grid’.

He talks specifically about being off time (which is what I’m referring to), so it’s not figurative. “grid” was also my term … i don’t think it was ever mentioned in the article.

I thought he means this figuratively, like Renoise itself being ‘off the grid’.

He talks specifically about being off time (which is what I’m referring to), so it’s not figurative. “grid” was also my term … i don’t think it was ever mentioned in the article.

Sorry, from my memories of the article I was thinking you quoted him, and it matched up with what I was thinking about it when I read it. My bad.

Cool, I love Frusciante.
Why renoise is more “rigid” than other DAWs? I dont get it, and Im a Ableton user…
Groove settings? Im really interested, in wich ways you find renoise worst that other daws

Cool, I love Frusciante.
Why renoise is more “rigid” than other DAWs? I dont get it, and Im a Ableton user…
Groove settings? Im really interested, in wich ways you find renoise worst that other daws

Tracker format makes it rather inconvenient to sequence less quantized, either you set the lines per beat stupidly high and can view one or two beats on the screen at a time and it also takes longer to navigate, or you use delay column/commands which give you less overview of where things are visually…and you’d need to create more note columns even for monophonic parts that are faster than your current resolution. Dunno how it works in ableton but in FL you can just hold alt to bypass snap settings, it’s quick and you see exactly where all notes are placed.

At least this is what I currently think, but a lot of people do seem to use very high LPB, so maybe it’s not that much of an inconvenience. I have a hard time even thinking about working that way constantly though. Of course, just being a good keyboardist and recording yourself is probably the best way to get a less quantized, more human feel anyway, and just about any sequencer is good enough for that

I’m finding all DAWS worse than other DAWS.

Dunno how it works in ableton but in FL you can just hold alt to bypass snap settings, it’s quick and you see exactly where all notes are placed.

In ableton you select “no grid” and its the same, i know fl studio too. But to actually see the details you need to zoom in for a beat in all the screen too… if not, youre moving the note to much, and you can do that in renoise with a semi high resolution.
if you are moving the notes a little bit the “visual help” from a piano roll I dont think would be visible at a whole bar zoom, forget 4 bars

Part of that is going to depend on your monitor size but if I move a note a few ticks I can usually see it without having to zoom in anywhere near to one or two beats on the screen(keep in mind most monitors are longer horizontally, you have more space to begin with as well). And if you do so, you can zoom out afterward

Not trying to bash on trackers here, overall I think it’s a great interface for composition that has a lot of advantages over a piano roll, but there are always tradeoffs, there is no perfect DAW

Part of that is going to depend on your monitor size but if I move a note a few ticks I can usually see it without having to zoom in anywhere near to one or two beats on the screen(keep in mind most monitors are longer horizontally, you have more space to begin with as well). And if you do so, you can zoom out afterward

Not trying to bash on trackers here, overall I think it’s a great interface for composition that has a lot of advantages over a piano roll, but there are always tradeoffs, there is no perfect DAW

no, obviously, not fanboy war here. im really interested in other people making music whit the same tools. But i always hear something like the “rigidity” of trackers and i believe that in a great way, is only visual perception. in the past 2 years i used more piano rolls, but im not felling that my music is groovy because of that… Aphex new album Syro was made in lot of analog gear (some daw involved surely, maybe renoise) and these analog sequencers are all about “primitive” numbers to controls groove via delay, like in renoise, but less intuitive, and Syro is fuckkinggg groovy.

You can definitely make something groovy that is perfectly quantized, still need to try this thing Frusciante is talking about in the interview about delaying instruments from each other…actually if I track or mouse sequence a song it’s usually the leads that I’m mostly likely to humanize or even try to record(and I suck at keyboard…), drums and bass or other parts that are setting the groove usually sound perfectly fine being quantized to me, but I like melodic parts to be looser

but frusciante is talking about groove in that way, the delay between instruments, is slight, for that reason we perceive it as groove and not “out of time” :slight_smile: