Understanding Euclidean Rhythms

Some ideas to play with.

The latest episode of Sound + Voltage takes a look at Euclidean Rhythms – a way of using math to describe beats that are distributed as evenly as possible, and how this is a feature of many common musical rhythms from around the world.

See also: Tool idea: Euclidean rhythm generator

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Maybe I’m a dumb,But I’ really dislike this “way of thinking” for music

Why would you say you are dumb for not liking a compositional method? Just because it’s not readily apparent to you doesn’t make you dumb. If you are not understanding of the method, it could be a good idea to take the time to learn about it. An extra tool in the tool-box is always handy to have!

The Euclidian method is actually quite popular outside of typical music, as it places great emphasis on beat rotation and how to vary parts in a natural, cyclical way. In a way, it’s very trance-inducing. Bossa-nova patterns, samba patterns - very common, very groovy!

Finally, as an actual drummer (my primary instrument), this is how one would go about not being typical. Learning these types of patterns can make one a better musician. This is also why I’ve spent the last 27 years of my life learning/working on how to compose electronic music. I didn’t want to be ‘just another drummer’, and have to listen to my bandmates tell me how stupid I am :smiley:

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3+3+2= dnb= euclidian 3/8

Just another lens through which to view rhythm :upside_down_face:

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I like math combined with music.
For example, creation using chaotic attractors is unlimited.
Applying a simple mathematical algorithm can completely change the sound and rhythm.

A simple case:
Take the number, if it is even then divide it by 2 / round to whole numbers please/
if it is odd then multiply it by 3 and add 1.
Then continue until the resulting number is equal to 1.
That is the whole algorithm. This way you get different lengths of sequences.

the conversion to notes consists in the fact that the obtained number, for example, modifies 140 by 24 / 2 octaves/ add 48 (C3) to the result and voila :slight_smile: then you can use it with a quantizer, etc.

note picture for number 47
test

in text: (140 % 24)

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Cool. I think I never heard of the term “euclidean rhythm”, but it’s pretty much the same what I did when I started creating music to get a feeling for beats. Especially when using a tracker math is always part of the game. Pattern length, LPB, BPM and so on, everything requires math. But personally I approach the matter less scientifically, I don’t use any formulars. :slightly_smiling_face:

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Look for math behind everything :slight_smile:

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I do. Have you seen “Pi”? Highly recommended. :slightly_smiling_face:

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Yes of course, but long time ago.
Have you listen how PI sounds like ?
And

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Anyone want to write a tool for generating euclidian rhythms? @joule’s New tool (3.1): Place selected notes evenly comes close, and with a little tweaking could make a very flexible euclidian rhythm generator.
I have a bunch of euclidian rhythms saved as phrases, but it would be nice to be able to generate exotic ones on the fly, using flexible divisions against a selected number of pattern lines…

Gotta learn to code so I can write tools myself, but in the meantime, this seems like some tasty, low-hanging fruit if anyone wants a little coding project

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I’m using dAnushri sometimes

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The xStream tool has a proper model for generating euclidean rhythms. (It’s a simple algorithm, but not quite as easy as rounding to grid iirc. I think of it as a ‘musical rounding algorithm’.)

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Oh, that’s great. Didn’t realize/remember that was in xstream. I’ll check out the implementation. I still think a dedicated euclidian tool would be great, but good to know it’s there! Thanks

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What an irony.
I remembered that I used to do something like that.
I also found the old source files on the disk :slight_smile:
The generator uses the Bresenham algorithm to distribute the pulses.
It has never been used.

EBG

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Euclidean rhythms are fun. And quite common in the modular synth world. Edit: seems that get mentioned in the first few moments of the video. :sweat_smile:

+1
from another non-coder.

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